Does Alli Work to Help Lose Weight?


Does Alli really work?The advancements in chemical and pharmaceutical technology over the past decade have introduced some new players into the ever-expanding market of weight loss and Alli is one of the market leaders.

The chemical capsule is produced by GlaxoSmithKline, the world’s largest pharmaceutical company, and is sold as a weight loss treatment. We will find out if it is effective or if indeed it is a waste of money.

Overview
The obesity epidemic is sweeping through America and Europe and this gives rise for a need to control it. GlaxoSmithKline believe that they have found the answer by way of a pill that can absorb fat from the human diet and therefore prevent weight gain.

The Claim
The product claims that there have been trials on multiple subjects and that almost half of them lost 5% body fat as a result of a using this product for a year. Around one fifth of subjects lost 10% body fat in the years trial.

So does this indicate success? Unfortunetely not. The trial shows that over half of the subjects failed to lose at least 5% body fat and therefore where not much better off than they were previously. Alli also causes some quite irritating side effects such as an increase in bowel movements and increased perspiration. As a result, there are several conditions under which this product is advised to be avoided such as during pregnancy and after recovering from illnesses.

The Hype
GlaxoSmithKline market this product with some trial research that details figures about the reduction in subjects contracting type 2 diabetes whilst taking Alli. They also mention that Alli will also reduce blood pressure of users and so maybe this product can be put to good use in cases of obesity.

The product is recommended for sale to only those over the age of 18 and with a body mass index score of over 28. People that fall into this category are categorised as morbidly obese and therefore are very unlikely to be able to walk or do any form of exercise.

The Cost
Alli is an over the counter version of Xenical and costs $39.50 for 42 pills and $65.00 for 84. The recommended dosage is to consume 4 capsules a day following meal times and prior to sleeping.

The Commitment
GlaxoSmithKline are a worldwide brand and possibly one of the most trusted brand names in the medicine industry. This product has huge backing and belief by the company to release it. They believe that it has the ability to change the lives of those people that are perhaps bed bound through obesity or unable to walk or do any exercise.

They do make it clear that Alli is not an alternative to healthy eating, more of an aide to be used conjunction with a good nutritional plan.

Evaluation
The active ingredient in Alli is Orlistat, which is a substance that is also found in other weight loss dieting pills but none to the quantity that Alli does. Orlistat accounts for approximately 50% of the pill making Alli the highest concentrated active ingredient pill.

As mentioned, the active ingredient will essentially prevent the stomach from digesting the fats into the walls of the stomach and therefore reduces the rate at which fat is created and stored on the body. However for best results the pill intake should be accompanied by a healthy eating plan. Ironically, eating healthy foods will help you lose weight all by itself, questioning the need to use Alli at all.

Does Alli Really Aid Weight Loss??

Clinical tests have shown that half of subjects lost 5% or more body fat after a year on constant use. This does not take into account the subject’s nutritional plans and exercise regime. The general consensus is that the best way to lose weight is to perform consistent exercise.

The Alli pill is a lazy way to lose weight and the evidence is not conclusive. For obese people that have type-2 diabetes or high blood pressure, this pill is likely to stimulate fat loss as well as improve medical condition.

Our Recommendation
Alli can help you lose weight but should always be a last alternative. Healthy eating and exercise are far better methods of fat loss but Alli does offer some benefits. However, it must be used as per the instructions and a healthy eating plan is essential for best results.

What do you think? Does Alli Really Work?


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{ 6 comments… read them below or add one }

LILLIAN Tubbs June 18, 2012 at 4:18 pm

I used Alli for an extended period of time and loved it. It was the only product that helped me lose weight. Yes I did have oily stools but only if I had a meal that contained a high fat content, like pizza. I also found it benificial becaue I have suffered from chronic constipation most of my life. With this product I didn’t have to take my prescribed daily medicine for constipation. I lost 26 lbs and felt much better.
Years ago, I had surgery,resulting in a large abdomenal ” over hang” due to the damage done to my abdomenal wall and muscles. This caused a gradual shift in my internal organs, leaving me with other health issues. With the weight lose, I still had the abdomenal “over hang” but I saw a reduction in it’s bulb, improvement in my asthma, reduction in back and leg issues and improved my ability to walk and ability to exercise.

Alli was not a cure all for my health issue but it give me a tool give me the ability to live a better, healthier life style of diet and exercise.

Now I found out that it has been taken off the market. I am very upset. Because of heart disease, hypertention and having had a stroke in the past, I can’t take fat burners, matabolism increasing, etc pills. Alli was the only product, that I know of, that blocked the absorption of fat.

When taking any medication, common sense is essential. For those with unwanted, negative side affects, don’t use it. For those of us it benefitted, please bring it back asap.

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Kelly K. July 11, 2013 at 12:48 am

I’m glad it worked for Lillian, but for the majority of people trying to lose weight, this is not a miracle drug. Alli still requires you to change your diet, as do many weight-loss methods. It’s better to try to change your diet and start with moderate exercise instead of jumping to a pill. The point of Alli is to block some of the fat you’re eating so that it doesn’t get absorbed into your body, which results in unfortunate bowel movements unless you have constipation or stop eating highly fatty foods. My roommate took this to help offset his poor college diet, and it resulted in embarrassing bathroom trips during long lectures. Reduce the fat in your diet and drink green tea after meals, this will help you reduce hunger and loose inches without the oily stools.

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Phyllis DeFalco July 14, 2013 at 1:27 am

I agree with Kelly. I tried it a few years ago and I was very uncomfortable for a while until I learned to curb my diet as well. I never had oily stools due to the fact that I never ate foods really high in fat. I realized at the end of it that I was wasting a lot of money; nearly $60 bucks a bottle and never lost a pound. I had 20 to lose initially and I was not very mobile as I am now I was quite sedentary actually. I moved back to my home town which is a walk around town and realized quickly that a change in diet that I was doing on the pill anyway, plus a lot of walking was what did the trick.

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Andres Vargas July 12, 2013 at 12:51 pm

It sounds like Lilian had success with this product because she was constipated. This drug, like all these so called diet pills, are basically laxatives. There is no pill you can take that is a substitute for a healthy, balanced diet and regular exercise. But no one wants to hear that. No one, especially those who are overweight, want to hear the truth about why they are overweight. They know, deep down that they are fat because they don’t eat right and they don’t exercise. But this puts the responsibility on them, and it is a heavy and painful responsibility. Better to think that it is some kind of glandular problem that can be fixed with a pill. It’s easier. But unfortunately, it doesn’t work. Ever.

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Josh B. July 18, 2013 at 10:07 pm

That’s what I was thinking! No pill can guarantee that success without it being something else in disguise. When I read Lillian story it seem that it was just great for relieving gas and working like a laxative like you said. You need 3 major factors in other to actually see results: healthy eating (fruits, vegetables, “good” fats like olive oil and nuts, etc), drinking a lot of water (at least 2 gallons a day spread out throughout the day) and some form of exercise 30-60 minutes a day. Otherwise you’re paying for expensive pills that don’t work. If you do lose some weight it’s usually unhealthy and you might end up gaining it back anyway. So why bother with relying on pills?

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Rhonda G August 4, 2013 at 12:28 am

My friend started taking Alli to lose weight. She lost quite a bit of weight, but she was always complaining about diarrhea and stomach cramps. She had to totally stay away from certain foods as it would instantly trigger diarrhea. You also have to follow a healthy eating program along with exercise, but I don’t know how healthy it is to have diarrhea all the time. She lost weight pretty quickly, but at the price of feeling sick isn’t really worth it to me.

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