Does Nerium Really Work?


Does Nerium work?Nerium is an anti-aging cream being sold through multi-level marketing as a way to fight the signs of aging as well as make a side or full-time income. They say their the newest company to be featured in Success at Home magazine, and when it comes to MLM you definitely want to get in early, but is their still time, or are you already a late arrival?

Overview
The basic crux with health and beauty products wrapped in a network marketing model is that you would use the product yourself, see the results, take the before and after pictures, and then become a poster child for the product, earning yourself a healthy income as a success story. This would give you the conviction you need to sell the product effectively, and it would allow others to see the proof that it works in the fresh face of the sales rep standing in front of them. But of course this is just theory, and real-world results often differ considerably.

The Claim
Nerium uses the word “real” so much it almost becomes suspect. They say that there’s real science behind their product, and that they provide a real business opportunity. They say that their product can help with the treatment of wrinkles and fine lines in the skin, help shrink pores, help with texture that’s uneven, as well as smooth out any discoloration you might be experiencing. Their compensation plan claims you get anywhere from 10% to 25% commission on products sold, and then 10% of anything that is sold by members you recruited.

In addition to the straight commission, there are also a series of bonuses that you can qualify for, as long as you’re ranked high enough within the company for that month. This can range anywhere from thousands of dollars to a monthly bonus paid to afford yourself a new Lexus.

The Hype
The hype for this company and product, as with most network marketing companies comes from the savvy affiliates already enrolled and trying to run their business. They’ll set up phony review videos and blogs that sound like they’re earnestly trying to help you decide on whether to use Nerium or if it makes a good choice for a start-up business, when in actuality they’re hoping you click on their affiliate link and buy from them or become part of their downline. To cut past the hype you need to listen to those that don’t like the product and have no interest in selling it.

The Cost
In an interesting twist you can buy Nerium on Amazon for around $90. Many times a product like this won’t be able to be found through a major online retailer because they try to funnel all sales through agents so that you get pitched to become one yourself. It’s $100 to receive a Brand Partner launch kit, which has marketing and promotional materials for you to get started, including a website that you can direct people to and start taking orders and collecting leads.

The Commitment
Any business requires commitment, and if you’re looking for a way to do nothing and sit back and collect checks you should try to come up with a catchy Christmas song that gets played Ad nauseam each year. MLM businesses are exceptionally challenging because they involve sales, which many people aren’t very good at and therefore require a lot of training. It also relies on getting involved with a company that can provide that training as well as a product worthy of personally endorsing and resting your hopes on.

Evaluation
When choosing a multi level marketing company the importance should be placed on how great of a product it is, but most people focus on the eye-popping compensation plans. These plans usually involve graphs and projected incomes based on selling a certain amount of product each month, and recruiting a certain number of reps that do the same as you.

One of the biggest cop-out answers to MLM businesses is that they say it won’t work for everyone because it requires a lot of work. This serves two purposes, it sounds like they’re being very honest, but it also speaks to those that are ready to roll up their sleeves and give it all they’ve got. When the product itself is splitting users 50/50 this means you’re going to have to find a steady influx of new users to replace your dissatisfied customers. Eventually the base of potential users dries up and what do you do then?

Final Nerium Review

You can safely avoid Nerium, both the product and the business opportunity.

What we noticed with the different pitches disguised as reviews was that they said it’s going to require a nearly Herculean effort to get to the point where you could count on this as your full time income. When going through their earnings projections we saw the same signs you’d see if someone was pitching you on a pyramid scheme. For example to attain a new Lexus in 90 days you’d simply need to sign up 3 people, and they sign up 3 people, and once again all of those sign up three people. Now you’re on top of a pyramid-shaped structure with 27 unlucky saps at the bottom hoping for their Lexus. Makes you wonder if you’re one of those 27 for someone else driving around in their brand new car.

Our Recommendation
MLM, aka Network Marketing, aka Relationship Marketing, or whatever fancy name they come up with in the future is not inherently bad, it’s just that in order to be good it has to create realistic expectations and it has to have a fantastic product at its core. J. Paul Getty once said “I’d rather have 1% of the effort of 100 men than 100% of my own effort.”, and that’s the principle at work here, but in order to make that happen it requires work in the form of training those other people, and you can’t train until you yourself can do a good job at it, so be ready to work no matter which MLM business you go with.

What do you think? Does Nerium work or not?


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{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

Andre February 19, 2013 at 5:49 am

10 to 25 percent commission for mlm marketing is a bit on the low side and I agree that nerium pushes their product and their company a little too aggressively to feel comfortable about their marketing strategy. You don’t feel confident about a product or a company when they try so hard to make a sale and I’m really not sold on nerium. Still, I’ll do a little more research before I pass judgment on them.

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Cassie March 20, 2013 at 10:42 pm

The slight edge…Read it. It explains all about the troubles and triumphs of network marketing. There is a modest living to be made in this industry, you just have to make sure that you can DO THE WORK, before you get in. We are so used to being handed a check for two weeks of tedious and boring work, but most of us can’t manage our own lives. Normal jobs give you a checklist of to-do’s and with this industry, YOU are the one responsible for your own success. Most people can’t handle this reality, NOR can they figure out how to begin! It is ALL too easy to blame the business, but let’s be real. It is you, and your reliance on instant gratification. Results NOW! Have some patience, and do a little more than you are normally used to. It is a SELF DRIVEN business. You are your boss. Say all you want about the product, knock it all down, but if you know anything about business, you know that it takes HARD work, and due diligence to get anywhere of importance in EVERY business. P.S. As for so called “Pyramid Schemes”, how is YOUR day to day company structured? A CEO at the top? Recruiting some employees with promises of promotion with hard work? Then they recruit a bunch of grunt workers, (You), with the same promise? Let’s just look at the Girl Scouts….Must be easier to support a bunch of teens selling cookies, but the structure works for a reason. It is Everywhere, you only need to filter through the compensation plans, and try the products. If that is too much for you, by all means, stay on board selling paper products….

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Karen March 22, 2013 at 1:29 pm

i’m only on my 2nd shipment right now and not as “Wow’d” as the person who got me interested in purchasing the product… i inconsistently think i’m seeing a difference…one day i say ‘yeah, maybe it is working’ and then the next day i say ‘this is def not working!” Not sure if i’m imagining it or not, but it seems to be working more as a skin bleaching cream for me, than a wrinkle cream. But, just when i think my brown spots are fading, they reappear w/a vengeance. i’ve also experienced some itchiness around the crow’s feet area…and sporadic acne break outs (which i haven’t experienced in years) At this point, i can NOT give this product a rave review. As far as the marketing side — i find the pics and posts on Facebook of people standing next to their new Lexus’ quite annoying. For now, i’m giving it ‘thumbs down’…. but i’m willing to try it for one more month; i think that’s fair.

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