Does QuietRock Really Work?

Does QuietRock Really Work?
2.61 (52.28%) 57 votes
Does QuietRock Really Work?
2.61

Does Quietrock really work?Considering QuietRock for your home? Soundproofing is necessary for certain establishments like theatres and studios, but sometimes soundproof walls are needed at home too. Basically, you can use two methods of soundproofing. You can either install multi-layered drywall fixtures or make use of modern sound dampening products.

QuietRock is just one of the many brands that make use of emerging sound-dampening technology. And so far, it is also one of the most popular too.

Overview
QuietRock sheets can be installed just like regular drywall products. However, when you tap on these sheets, you will notice that there is no resonance and reverberation. The company behind the QuietRock product is called Serious Materials, and it has a good reputation among home builders and construction workers.

The Claim
QuietRock claims to be the “lowest cost noise reduction wall panel on the market.” By just using a single sheet of it you are guaranteed a soundproof wall. And these wall panels are easy to install too, as they can be cut just like standard drywall panels with a utility knife. These walls offer sound absorption and dampening to soundproof a particular area or room.


The Hype
With its high STC ratings, QuietRock wall panels have become in demand for the construction of studios, theatres, and soundproof rooms. According to the maker of these materials, you can save money by installing just one layer of wall panel instead of several sheets to make a particular room soundproof and noise-free.

The Cost
There are different types and models of QuietRock wall panels. The standard type of sheet costs around $50 or so. On the other hand, a single sheet of ordinary drywall panel costs around $30. As you can see, QuietRock costs almost twice as much as ordinary wall panels. However, you may need to install 8 layers of these ordinary panels to make a particular room soundproof. If you’ve got two bedrooms that share a wall, it might be worth the cost to have peace and quiet and not hear every little sound that comes from the room.

The Commitment
QuietRock wall panels can either be installed directly or indirectly on studs. However, to make the soundproofing quality work, there should be some kind of framing installed behind the wall. Note that if you install QuietRock on any surface that doesn’t have framing or studs, the soundproofing quality will not work. It is therefore advised that you hire a knowledgeable contractor to do the job, as this type of wall panel has special prerequisites in order to work.

Evaluation
The QuietRock product is really good. However, it can be quite expensive if you compare it with ordinary wall panels. But as long as you follow the right procedures on its installation, you can be sure that the system can be very effective. There are also different models of QuietRock to choose from, so you can actually go for the type that your budget allows.

If you get the model #525, it can take the place of 8 layers of standard drywall panels. Besides, there are a lot of disadvantages to installing multi-layered walls. Aside from the added expense (material and labor costs), you will also be putting too much weight on the walls. And you will also lose some of the available space in a particular room.

Does QuietRock Really Work?

Yes, QuietRock wall panels work amazingly if you follow the proper steps during installation. It works effectively for soundproofing and it also works in saving you money. You see, these panels may seem to be expensive when compared to ordinary wall panels. However, if you need to install multiple layers of standard wall panels in order to make a room soundproof, you will need to spend on glue, sealers, and even labor. And that will add up to a lot of money and a lot of time as well.

Plus, normal drywall doesn’t have much in the way of soundproofing. If you have a smaller home with everyone living right next to each other, you can have a feeling of privacy by having soundproofed walls. It’s a way to have a seemingly bigger house without the extra size.

Our Recommendation
We highly recommend QuietRock wall panels for your home, studios, or any room that you want soundproofed. It’s very effective and it works just like it was advertised to work. Its claim of having the lowest cost in noise reduction system is based on modern technology and the walls can really absorb and dampen sounds. So even if the prices of these wall panels are 2 or 3 times higher than standard wall panels, it’s still worth the money as it is 8 times more effective.

What Do You Think? Does QuietRock Really Work?


Does QuietRock Really Work?
2.61 (52.28%) 57 votes
Does QuietRock Really Work?
2.61

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{ 20 comments… read them below or add one }

D December 31, 2014 at 1:06 am

Don’t waste your money it DOESNT work

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Allison November 16, 2015 at 6:32 pm

We recently had quiet rock installed in our semi-detached home by our contractor, to reduce/eliminate noise heard by and from our adjoining neighbours. We did this as part of a renovation and the product simply did not work. As I write this, I am listening to my neighbour puttering around his/her house, creaking on the floors, etc. this was so disappointing – a huge waste of money!!

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Steve Sorich March 11, 2016 at 9:45 pm

Hi Allison,

Unfortunately, the reason the QuietRock did not work for your application is because QuietRock does not reduce the transmission of structural noise (as you describe, “puttering or walking around and creaky floors”). QuietRock is designed to and reduces only airborne noise (talking, music, TV noise, etc.), and has no effect on structural transmission (also sometimes referred to as impact or “footstep” noise). It is unfortunate that you did not contact QuietRock before considering to use it for your application as we would have told you that it would not have provided any benefit for your particular noise issue.

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vlad November 26, 2015 at 4:06 pm

I’m very disappointed.
It did not work.
It was installed on both sides of the wall.
Waste of money!

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parpl201 December 14, 2015 at 1:07 am

Question for the people that said it doesnt work. Did you install this product with any other products like Roxul Safe and Quiet batting between the joists or wall or Resilient Channel to hang the Quiet Boards from. If this product didnt have additional layers of insulation then you did not do your research and this product was not installed correctly.

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Robert Allen January 26, 2016 at 8:51 pm

Where are you shopping that regular drywall is $30 per sheet?! It is $9 per sheet at home depot. This makes Quietrock more than 5x the cost, not only 2x.

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Dan February 10, 2016 at 8:34 pm

This article was clearly written by a shill for QuietRock, and for that matter, a shill with a tenuous grasp on how acoustics and sound isolation works.

Using this product (or any product for that matter) to “soundproof” a room is a fool’s errand. First of all, the term “soundproof” is a misnomer, as even an 18″ thick recording studio wall will allow sound through if (1) the sound is loud enough, and/ or (2) there are flanking paths around the “soundproof” wall for sound to follow. For example, if you install two layers QuietRock to both sides of a stud wall (with batt insulation in the stud cavities) that completely encloses a room, but there is a flanking path (could be a door undercut, back-to-back junction boxes, common ductwork, a small unsealed penetration for conduit or piping, or a number of other conditions), the room will not be “soundproof”. These types of conditions are nearly impossible to avoid in residential construction, especially in a retrofit situation. The claim that “By just using a single sheet of it you are guaranteed a soundproof wall” is horse pucky – pure and simple.

The facts are as follows: This type of product is available from many manufacturers, and are all essentially the same – thin layers of gypsum separated by a resilient septum. The septum both adds mass, and reduces (but does not eliminate) the ability of vibration to transmit through the panel. This type of product is, in fact more difficult to work with than standard gypboard, because the presence of the septum complicates penetrations for junction boxes, conduit, piping, etc. It also comes at a significant cost premium over the standard product.

As a rule of thumb, you can get the same acoustical benefit by using two layers of standard gypboard that you would realize through the use of one layer of QuietRock, or a similar product. “Soundproof” conditions will not be guaranteed under any conditions. If the goal is to increase sound isolation between adjacent areas, there is no substitute for a trained professional to come out and survey the situation. If this is the case, I recommend visiting http://www.ncac.com, the National Council of Acoustical Consultants website, and in the top center of the homepage is a link for a nation-wide (USA) directory of acoustical consultants who are not beholden to any particular manufacturer or product.

Reply

Steve Sorich March 11, 2016 at 9:39 pm

I feel it fair to point out a few innacuracies in your post above Dan. First of all, several things you point out here are fairly accurate, for instance, the realistic assertion that one cannot truly soundproof any space. One can only reduce sound transmission by degree which is dependent on a myriad of factors both associated with the barrier as designed and constructed but also as to how well flanking paths and various penetrations are evaluated and treated.

In regards to QuietRock and how it actually does what it does, the panel attenuates sound energy through a process referred to as “constrained layer damping” This process was originally developed for use in quieting aircraft. Constrained layer damping relies on a layer of a visco-elastic medium applied between two substrates. In the case of QuietRock, the two substrates used are gypsum panels. Constrained layer damping is actually a conversion of acoustical energy into heat through the action of the two substrate layers receiving sound energy and flexing and shearing against each other. The visco-elastic medium or as some people refer to as adhesive, wants to return to its shape and is attempting to prevent the two substrates from vibrating and the resultant energy is converted/expended as heat (which as you know one cannot hear!). I invite you to look up this topic on a Google search.

Furthermore, your assertion that the “septum” as you describe it, is not adding mass at all, just its inherent damping characteristics as described above. The visco-elastic being a thin adhesive layer in the panel does nothing to complicate installation/cutting as you assert here. Some of the difficulty in workability of acoustic damped (notice I said “damped” here, not “dampening” as the author describes above). has do do with the various ways that acoustic damped panels are and have been constructed in the past. Things have changed quite a bit with these panels since they were first developed.

Lastly, your statement that “you can get the same acoustical benefit by using two layers of standard gypboard that you would realize through the use of one layer of QuietRock, or a similar product” is also incorrect as the true comparison of products used in the assembly of a partition wall or barrier can only be done through a direct comparison of products in side-by-side laboratory acoustical STC testing. STC (Sound Transmission Class) ratings are determined by all of the components that are part of the overall assembly and also pertaining to the assembly configuration. It is my experience and from our fairly extensive testing of QuietRock in various third-party independent laboratories that acoustic damped drywall panels can significantly out-perform mulitiple standard gypsum layer assemblies. However, in evaluating this, it is important that comparisons are “apples to apples”. This unfortunately gets missed quite often in “from the hip” comparisons made.

Unfortunately, our company was not contacted by the author of this beforehand and some of the statements/assertions made here are currently either out of date or not entirely accurate.

In invite you to contact us at QuietRock and review the documentation on http://www.QuietRock.com.

Regards,

Steve Sorich

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rjb May 23, 2016 at 9:33 pm

Besides my own installation proving when installed CORRECTLY, QuietRock absolutely reduces airborne sound transmission, here is proof from a secondary source with a reputation for honesty: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZlAZsYp2M-U

For the record: QuietRock will *not* reduce sound caused by vibration (i.e., items dropped on a hardwood floor, knocking or hammering on a wall, slamming a door shut, and so on.). So if you installed QuietRock to reduce that type of noise and it doesn’t work: why don’t you go back and read the product information and stop blaming the product for your mistake? Or go ahead and keep using things for what they weren’t designed for…

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Susanne June 8, 2016 at 10:21 pm

Hello,
I am about to have a small music studio in my garage built. The estimate includes Quietrock and has increased the price by $1100. I want to know if it is worth adding quiet rock the the two walls we are adding to create this space. Our hope is to muffle the sounds of musical instruments. Also, if you suggest Quietrock, what is the best way to install it? I read it is best between a layer of gypboard. Please advise. Thanks, Susanne

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LARRY July 18, 2016 at 11:40 pm

HELLO,

I have a 50 plus yr old house with the wonderful plaster type walls. The sound that comes through the walls are unbelievable, from air planes, people talking and stereo and tv from neighbors… Can I install Quiet Rock over the existing walls and would it work in my situation?

Thanks, Larry

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Fiddleton October 25, 2016 at 8:55 pm

Only posting to clear up some misconceptions here and lend some “sound” advice (har har)

FACT: Quietrock DOES work to improve soundproofing, and significantly, but it is CRUCIAL that it is installed correctly. First, it is important that you insulate between your studs with ROXUL Safe and Sound insulation, using Quietrock alone is complete silliness. Second, and equally important, you MUST use RESILIENT CHANNEL — specially designed metal strapping that goes over your studs/joists to dampen contact between the Quietrock and your studs/joists.

For anyone interested in actually understanding more, I highly recommend you simply search for some tutorials on Youtube, instead of reading through inane comment threads like this.

You are welcome!

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Sebastian December 6, 2016 at 5:06 pm

You forgot to mention if you use regular sheetrock with insulation and reslient channel will drop sound dramatically.
Question is how much quieter is you product vs regular sheetrock?

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Steve February 2, 2017 at 4:41 am

I have been reading the posts on this forum…or rant page, whatever you’d like to call it. I’m curious, is just anyone allowed to say something here? I assume the multiple posts that confidently claim to know how to use this product are by do-it- yourselfers? Put it on resilient channel? The product this was made to replace? Anyone not using insulation in the wall should be forced to listen to all of the sound flowing through the wall indefintly as well as change dropping to remind them that they spent extra money…….over using the word assert, doesn’t make you look smart, it makes you look like you have a word of the day calendar on your desk at your job which I assume is in front of a computer, not out in the field actually using what we call “tools”……tricky I know. I am curious by reading all of these posts because I was on the “quiet rock” site and it’s almost like none of you have even seen it………Except for mister assertion.

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Steve February 2, 2017 at 4:57 am

Sorry, wasn’t done! I looked here to see if anyone had put it in and had a valuable response. The guy talking like a quiet rock rep seems to know the book side of it and all of the technical specs but I’m curious about real world usage,’not lab tests. Remodels…new construction….. multi family housing party walls……. resilient channel is old technology but is still used. Cheaper but less effective as it is easy to screw up and allow a lot of flanking, which I was excited to see that word being used because I would assume those who used the word flanking might have a slight understanding of the sound wall assembly. Calm down mr assert, I’m just looking for guys that have actually installed it and can tell me about the difference from old to new tech on these set ups. I plan to call and talk to a quiet rock tech to hopefully get some ideas as the website is pretty vague and only offers a few uses and assemblies but I was hoping to hear from another builder or someone a little more experienced than the average weekend warrior that finished their basement or put on a deck for a buddy. No offense to any, just seems to be a quite a random array of theories and no real experiences except for one time hits that just say “it didn’t work.”

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Steve February 2, 2017 at 5:16 am

Ok last thing! I forgot to mention, anyone who puts a you tube video of mike Holmes, a tv “contractor”…….. and I stress the “”……. should not try to give advice. No offense but if you are following an over confident tv personality for your “secondary source”, you might just stick to watching hgtv and skip the advice giving! . I am not calling you out, I just think it’s funny that Holmes is what you thought would be a good source for wether quiet rock “really works”……..I mean come one….. mike Holmes? I did get a really good laugh when I clicked on the link and his face popped up on my screen…..thanks for the laugh at least!

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Joseph Buckalew February 21, 2017 at 12:37 am

Well, despite the back and forth, I did find what I was looking for…namely the transmission of non-airborne vibrational noise is not abated by this product. It seems to be the one thing everyone agrees on.

This is my project….A large barn was converted into a barn-dominium on the first floor, with two basketball courts/training facility on the second floor. The owners are expecting a baby and want to be able to insulate her room from the noise. It seems that quiet rock might help to some degree because there will certainly be coaches yelling, sneakers squeaking, and aerobicizers (making whatever noises they make) producing airborne noise. Is there an economical way to insulate the little one from the vibrational noise. On a budget, young couple and first child, I’m thinking a simple white noise machine or even a fan along with the quiet rock might be the best bet. Thoughts?

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the jester May 17, 2017 at 6:58 am

It will work, but for an extreme case like yours you will need to do a room within a room type of construction.

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Danielle May 18, 2017 at 4:24 am

I installed this 8 years ago in my Manhattan apartment. I still hear retain structural noises but everything else is so far below pre-installation level. I’ve lived here a long time so I distinctly remember years of late nights hearing upstairs neighbor’s “You’ve got mail!” After the QuietRock ceilings we hear very little voice or ambient noise. Well well worth it with two little kids.

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louise May 23, 2017 at 12:09 pm

I have a half a double. I share a wall between the houses from top to bottom. Its the living room area that is driving me crazy. I hear their bass from the music. I have a layer of drywall, and then sheet of paneling over that. How would quiet rock work for this? Would it work?? Rip down what is there or just put over top?

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Does QuietRock Really Work?
2.61 (52.28%) 57 votes
Does QuietRock Really Work?
2.61